Coastal Features: South Head to Botany Bay

Gap Bluff: ocean headland to the north of The Gap at Watsons Bay. On July 2, 1895 the School of Gunnery was established on the heights becoming the School of Artillery in the early 1930's. During World War II, the navy established a radar station here and in 1945, HMAS Watson was established as a Radar Training School shifting to its present site around 1956. In 1982, the Gap Bluff area was gazetted as part of the Sydney Harbour National Park and officially opened to the public on November 3, 1990

Dunbar Head: recalls the British clipper Dunbar which was wrecked here in 1857.


Diamond Bay

Diamond Bay: its origin remains obscure, but the earliest record of that name appears in a "Report and Map of the Harbour Defences", dated January 3, 1863.

Rose Gully: George Rose (1744-1818), the Joint Secretary to the Treasury in England in Governor Phillip's time played an important part in the establishment of the colony and is remembered by the two Sydney place names.


Murriverie Pass

Murriverie Pass: the name of a fissure in the coastal cliffs which is derived from its Aboriginal name, 'Marevera'.

Ben Buckler: the name first appeared in 1831 and is believed to have been bestowed by Governor Macquarie, who called it 'Ben - becula' due to its resemblance to an island in Scotland's Outer Hebrides. Other theories are that Ben Buckler is a corruption of the Aboriginal word 'Baal - buckalea'; or that Ben Buckler was a convict who lived in the rocks at North Bondi.

Bondi Bay: recalls the Aboriginal name for the bay, Boondi. It is a word which described the sound of waves breaking on the beach.


Mackenzies Bay

Mackenzies Point / Bay: recalls a farmer who grazed cattle on his property here in the 1880s. Aboriginal name: Grama Grama.

Tamarama Bay: was first recorded as a name in 1885 when a fatality at the beach was reported. Also known as Dixons Bay after Dr. Dixon, a nearby land owner, it later became Fletcher's Glen when David Fletcher bought a 10 acre frontage. Aboriginal name: Oramaramma, from which the present name is derived.


Nelson Bay

Nelson Bay: named for Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson, who was given the title of Duke of Bronte by the King of Sicily. It was thus named because of its proximity to the Sydney suburb of Bronte.

Shark Point: presumably after a shark or sharks were caught here.

Clovelly Bay: was once known as Little Coogee and was renamed Clovelly after the seaside village of that name in Devon, England.


Gordons Bay

Gordons Bay: believed to have been named Gordons Bay after Lewis Gordon, a government surveyor who carried out survey work in this district in early 1939. He built 'Cliffbrook', the old mansion still standing in Gordon Avenue, Clovelly, on land granted to him by the Crown, which part, it is recorded, included the bay below. Aboriginal name: Coojee (see Coogee Bay below).

Coogee Bay: Aboriginal, meaning bad smell, presumably coined because of the smell of rotting seaweed on the beach. Aboriginal name: Bobroi.


Wedding Cake Island

Wedding Cake Island: descriptive of its shape.

Lurline Bay: believed to have been named after a Sydney Harbour tug, in a similar way to nearby Undine Street. Formerly known as Lilli Pilli Bay.

Mistral Point: origin unknown.

Maroubra Bay: of Aboriginal origin (Merro-berah) and meaning 'like thunder', which presumably refers to the sound of waves crashing on the shore. Appears in early records as Brand and Long Bay. Aboriginal name: Mooroobra.


Wreck of SS Malabar

Malabar Beach: named after the Burns Philps ship SS Malabar which was wrecked on the north side of Long Bay on 2nd April 1931.

Magic Point: origin unknown.

Boora Point: Boora was the Aboriginal Name for Long Bay.

Long Bay: descriptive, relative to nearby Little Bay.

Little Bay: descriptive, relative to nearby Long Bay. Prior to European settlement, the bay was used as a burial site by the local Aborigines.

Cape Banks: named by Lt. James Cook in April 1770 after Sir Joseph Banks, Endeavour's botanist and patron of Cook's first voyage of discovery.


Bare Island

Bare Island: descriptive. It was marked as Bare Island by Lt. James Cook in April 1770 when he visited Botany Bay. It was not meant as the island's name, rather a description.

Henry Head: Aboriginal name: Wadba Wadba.


Congwong Beach

Congwong Beach / Bay: The Aboriginal name for the location, which was first recorded by assistant surveyor-general Robert Dixon when he surveyed Botany Bay and Port Hacking in 1827.

Botany Bay



Botany Bay: Named by Lieut. James Cook in April 1770 as it was here that the bark Endeavour's naturalists found many new plants that were at the time unknown to the western world. Originally named Stingray Harbour by Cook. Aboriginal name: Burrabri.

Cruwee Cove: Named after an Aboriginal who, during early colonial times, claimed to have sighted James Cook's arrival at Botany Bay in 1770. He is reported to have lived to the mid 1850s.


Frenchmans Bay

Frenchmans Bay: The place where French explorer Francois de Galaup, Comte de La Perouse and his crew rested during their sojourn at Botany Bay in January/February 1788. It is also the burial place of Pere Louis Receveur, a Franciscan friar who came to Australia as a scientist on L'Astrolabe with La Perouse. He died here on 17th February 1788 from an injury received during an attack by natives in Samoa two months earlier.

Yarra Bay: Aboriginal word meaning flowing. It is believed to have originally been the name of the creek which flowed into Botany Bay between Frenchmans and Yarra Bays, which was marked thus on maps from the 1850s. Earlier maps mark the Bare Island headland as Yarra Point. Marked on early maps as Phillip Bay, Yarra Bay was named after Gov. Arthur Phillip who came ashore here on 24th January 1788 upon arrival with the First Fleet in search of the lush meadows Joseph Banks had spoken of. The name has been adopted by the nearby suburb but dropped for the bay itself. Aboriginal name: Yarra.

Pussycat Bay: origin unknown.


Botany's Sister City Marker, Molyneux Point

Molyneux Point: Named by Lieut. James Cook during his visit to Botany Bay in April 1770 after Robert Molyneux, master of HMS Endeavour.

Brotherson Dock: William Brotherson, President of the Maritime Services Board in the 1980s when the Port of Botany was being developed.


Brotherson Dock

Bunnerong Creek: of Aboriginal origin. Believed to be the Aboriginal name for the locality.

Bunnerong Creek: of Aboriginal origin. Believed to be the Aboriginal name for the locality.

Penrhyn Estuary: recalls the first fleet convict transport vessel Penrhyn.

Bumborah Point: Aboriginal name for the reef here. The name was first recorded by assistant surveyor-general Robert Dixon when he surveyed Botany Bay and Port Hacking in 1827. He elected to use the Aboriginal names for geographical features rather than give new names.


Lady Robinsons Beach

Lady Robinsons Beach: Originally named Seven Mile Beach. It was changed to its present name in 1874, which honours the wife of the then Governor of NSW, Hercules Robinson.

Patmore Swamp: thus named because it bordered on the land grant of Patrick Moore. It was reclaimed and called Scarborough Park in 1879, recalling the time the First Fleet transport Scarborough had anchored in Botany Bay in 1788 and therefore already has associations with the area.

Bado-berong Creek: Aboriginal word in the Eora dialect of the Darug language meaning small fish.

Goomun Creek: Aboriginal word in the Eora dialect of the Darug language for the Casuarina tree.

Waradiel Creek: Aboriginal word in the Eora dialect of the Darug language for a mullet.

Dolls Point: Origin unknown.

Strippers Point: origin unknown. The name was originally used for the surrounding area. It was later changed to Sandringham. The name probably refers to bark strippers who probably set up camp here while working the area.


Sandringham Beach

Sandringham Beach: named to honour the Prince of Wales, Edward VII, and his royal residence at Sandringham, Norfolk, England. In 1872, William Edward Rust built a hotel here, naming it the Prince of Wales Hotel and the district Sandringham. At the time, the Prince of Wales was building a royal residence at Sandringham in Norfolk, England.

Rocky Point: descriptive. Originally named Charlotte Point by Catherine Rutter, the wife of early settler Robert Cooper who was granted 40 acres in the area. It was named after her mother.


Towra Point

Towra Point / Bay: Aboriginal name for Kurnell peninsula. Towra Bay has also been known as Stinkpot Bay. The name was first recorded by assistant surveyor-general Robert Dixon when he surveyed Botany Bay and Port Hacking in 1827. He elected to use the Aboriginal names for geographical features rather than give new names.

Spit Island: descriptive, as the island is actually a sand bar or spit. It has been managed as a breeding site for the endangered Little Tern as it is isolated from the mainland of Towra Point and is therefore safe from predators such as foxes. Like the rest of Towra point, Spit Island is a sand spit that was formed following the stabilisation of sea levels close to their current level a few thousand years ago.

Bonna Point: derived from its Aboriginal name, Burra Burra. The name was first recorded by assistant surveyor-general Robert Dixon when he surveyed Botany Bay and Port Hacking in 1827. He elected to use the Aboriginal names for geographical features rather than give new names.

Weeney Bay: The Aboriginal name for the location, which was first recorded by assistant surveyor-general Robert Dixon when he surveyed Botany Bay and Port Hacking in 1827.


Quibray Bay

Quibray Bay: The Aboriginal name for the location, which was first recorded by assistant surveyor-general Robert Dixon when he surveyed Botany Bay and Port Hacking in 1827.

Australia For Everyone: Ph: 0412 879 698 | Email
Content © 2017, Australia For Everyone