Greenwich



The affluent harbourside suburb of Greenwich occupies a peninsula on the northern side of Sydney Harbour, at the opening of the Lane Cove River. The suburb features harbour views, a few pockets of bushland, shops, restaurants and cafes, a harbour swimming pool with shark net.

Greenwich House, at the corner of George and St Lawrence Sts, was built by George Green around 1837-41. He actually named it Willoughby. Built with large cellars and a tavern underneath, it had been intended as an Inn. It was bought by Captain Gother Kerr Mann in 1853. When Green and his father Amaziah first bought their riverside property in the 1930s, they became the first of a number shipbuilders who operated on the Greenwich shoreline. When Green subdivided his land in 1840, the name Greenwich was mentioned for the first time.



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Greenwich Baths


Greenwich Baths: UBD Map 215 Ref J 14. O Connell Street, Greenwich. The most westerly beach on Port Jackson, Greenwich Baths is a sheltered swimming enclosure in a small bay towards the end of the Greenwich peninsula. Facilities: picnic tables, toilets, kiosk, shaded grassed area, children s  playground.

Public transport: ferry to Greenwich wharf, walk north along Mitchell St, right into George St, right into Albert St.
Greenwich Point


Greenwich Point is believed to be named after nearby Greenwich House, which was built by boatbuilder George Green in 1836. Facilities: toilets, picnic tables, grassed area, boat ramp at Greenwich Sailing Club nearby.

Public transport: ferry to McMahons Point. bus No. 265 from McMahons Point. Alight at cnr Manns Avenue and George Street. Walk east down George Street, right into Victoria, left into Prospect.
Manns Point


Manns Point offers a somewhat different perspective to this section of the river to most vantage points on the Lower North Shore, taking in Balmain on the opposite shore. The first Sydney Harbour tunnel was a tunnel built between Manns Point, Greenwich, and Long Nose Point, Birchgrove, between 1913 and 1924. It carried the power cables for the electric tramway and railway services on the north shore. When other power sources replaced the tunnel in 1969, the electricity supply was disconnected and the cables cut. A concrete slab covers the entrance to a now flooded tunnel in the Manns Point Reserve.

Manns Point lookout

Steps nearby lead up to the Manns Point lookout with its spectacular panorama of the Harbour from Cockatoo Island to the city and into Balls Head Bay and Gore Cove. Manns Point is a 1.6 km (20 minute) walk from Woolstonecraft station via Smoothey Park.
Lane Cove Bushlnd Reserve


The valley of Gore Creek is a beautiful, tranquil strip of bushland that has managed to survive the urbanisation of the surrounding area. A walking track alongside Gore Creek gives access to the reserve from a number of locations.

The section below River Road contains the picturesque Lilly Pilly Falls which can be viewed at close range via stone steps. The falls and water pool below it were once a popular picnic and bathing spot. Urban development upstream has severely affected the amount of water coming over the falls, but they are still quite impressive after heavy rain. Gore Creek enters Lane Cove River through Gore Creek Reserve where timbergetters used to load barges with timber cut from the surrounding area.

Vegetation north of River Road is a mix of open forest and rainforest, the latter being predominant in the steep-sided gullies of the upper section. A century ago, Paddy s Flats (above), located above a series of rapids, was once lush, shaded pasture where cattle grazed. Access the reserve is via St. Vincents Road, Greenwich; Ronald Avenue, Gore Hill, River Road, Northwood and Cogan Place, Osborne Park.

Public transport: bus No. 261 from Sydney Town Hall. Alight where River Rd passes Gore Creek Reserve.
Smoothey Park/Milray Reserve


To the immediate east of Greenwich, the Lower North Shore suburb of Wollstonecraft is encapsulated on three sides by a delightful ribbon of natural bushland on its harbourside shoreline. On its border with Greenwich, and just 20 metres from the railway station exit is Smoothey Park, a pleasant bushland reserve through which flows Gore Creek, bouncing its way over rocks and through splashing pools on its way to Gore Cove.

A walking path alongside it meanders through Milray Reserve to the cove then follows its shoreline to the isthmus connecting Berry Island to the peninsula. The walk around Berry Island includes Aboriginal rockart and harbour views to the city. Easy walk. Walk from station to Berry Isld via Smoothy Park, return to station via Shirley Rd  1.6 km.

Public transport: bus No. 261 from Sydney Town Hall. Alight where River Rd passes Gore Creek Reserve.
About Greenwich


The Cammeraygal clan of the Guringai people were the first inhabitants of the Greenwich area, and lived along the foreshores of the harbour, hunting in the hinterland and trading with other clans. The first known occasion when a European went to the area was in 1788, when Lieutenant Henry Ball passed through the area while returning from a trip to the Middle Harbour area. Land grants began in 1794 and industries developed in the area during the 1830s. The settlement on the point was slow to develop, there being only 16 houses there by the 1880s. Aboriginal people were still present in the 1820s, but disease and displacement had driven them out by the 1860s.

Berry Island Park



Greenwich Point, referred to as the Village of St Lawrence in early days, developed much earlier than the upper part of Greenwich. With a sizable population, school, general store, post office and butcher, the village was already beginning to adopt the trappings of a suburb by the 1880s. Light industry was set up along the foreshores of Greenwich, including Shipbuilding, brickmaking, quarrying, and the Patent Asphaltum Company which refined bitumen and manufactured building materials. The Shell Transport and Trading Company opened a terminal at Gore Bay in 1901, importing and distributing petroleum products. It grew over time to include the sites of the Patent Asphaltum works, and several wharves, as well as the shale oil refining works of John Fell & Co. By the late 1930s, over 500 workers were employed at the Shell site.

Greenwich ferry wharf provides access to the Inner Harbour ferry services, with ferry services to Circular Quay. A bus service from Greenwich Point runs to McMahons Point, Lane Cove and St Leonards (Route 265). The closest train stations are at Wollstonecraft and St Leonards.


The Shell Transport and Trading Company opened a terminal at Gore Bay in 1901, importing and distributing petroleum products. It grew over time to include the sites of the Patent Asphaltum works, and several wharves, as well as the shale oil refining works of John Fell and Co. By the late 1930s, over 500 workers were employed at the Shell site. The Terminal is located on ten hectares of land. Via a 19km 300mm diameter underground pipeline more than four million tonnes of finished products are imported through the terminal for transfer to Shell s Clyde Refinery by pipeline every year. The Gore Bay Terminal operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Very few people know that there are in fact three tunnels under Sydney Harbour. What is known as the Railway electricity tunnel (built 1916-1926), which passes under Sydney Harbour from Long Nose Point to Greenwich, was the second, preceding the road tunnel by 70 years and built at a time the first tunnel, from a coal mine at Brichgove, was being dug. The railway electricity tunnel was a major technological and engineering achievement and the first such venture of its kind to be undertaken in Australia without overseas assistance. It was constructed to bring electrical power to the railway and tramway systems of the North Shore from the recently completed Ultimo Power Station.
The tunnel is lined with concrete in some areas, cast iron in some and bedrock in others. At the centre of the tunnel is a large chamber where pumps were located to remove water. One side of the tunnel is lined with reinforced concrete shelves to house the electricity cables. The tunnel held twelve cables, 8 x 11,000 volt and two 50 pair communication cables. A lack of adequate maintenance resulted in the tunnel becoming flooded in 1930. In 1952 the Electricity Commission took over all power generation in Sydney but the railways retained the tunnel and cables. Use of the the tunnel ceased in 1969. The northern entrance to the tunnel is marked by a concrete block placed over it in the reserve on the headland of Manns Point.




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  • How to Get There:

    Greenwich ferry wharf provides access to the Inner Harbour ferry services, with ferry services to Circular Quay. A bus service from Greenwich Point runs to McMahons Point, Lane Cove and St Leonards (Route 265). The closest train station is Wollstonecraft. To reach Greenwich, take the path north into Smoothey Park, then cross the valley via the footbridge. The path terminates in St Giles Avenue, Greenwich.

    The Name

    The name is believed to have been taken from Greenwich on the Thames River, England. Greenwich is one of many localities fronting the Parramatta River which are named after towns on the River Thames. The fact that the name is similar to that of the original landowner, George Green, might have incluenced the choice of name.

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